Remembering the 1st NBA All-Star Game

Remembering the 1st NBA All-Star Game

Ed Macauley waited two years to be named Most Valuable Player of the first NBA All-Star Game. But that's nothing compared to how look it took Macauley to get his trophy.

Try 52 years.

The first All-Star Game was played 60 years ago on March 2, 1951 at Boston Garden. Macauley, a Celtics center, scored 20 points and helped hold legendary West center George Mikan to 12 points on 4-of-17 shooting in his East team's 111-94 victory.

Macauley didn't think much more about that night until the third All-Star Game in 1953. The NBA decided to start handing out an MVP award and had sportswriters vote to retroactively name winners for the first two games. Macauley was honored for 1951 and Paul Arizin for 1952.

"When you get it two years later, you can't get too excited,'' said Macauley, 82, now retired in the St. Louis area. "But still that was a great honor.''

Not that Macauley initially got anything.

Macauley in 2003 was being interviewed on a St. Louis radio show when he was asked by the host about his trophy. Macauley responded, "What trophy?''

When it was learned Macauley never got anything for his MVP night, the NBA agreed to come up with a trophy. It was sent to Saint Louis University, Macauley's alma mater, and a banquet was held there to present him the award.

As for Macauley's East teammate 60 years ago, Dolph Schayes waited 58 years to be reminded he scored the first basket in the first All-Star Game. FanHouse reported last year Schayes didn't remember that accomplishment until his son Danny, a former longtime NBA center, paid close attention to an old highlight reel the NBA sent for a 2009 banquet held for Schayes in his hometown of Syracuse, N.Y.

Even NBA officials didn't seem to know that legendary announcer Marty Glickman says on the reel that Schayes scored that first basket in All-Star history shortly after the jump ball on a runner from the left side.

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