What Took So Long to Cancel Marathon?

What Took So Long to Cancel Marathon?

The drinking water in Breezy Point, Queens, an area absolutely devastated by Hurricane Sandy, is no longer safe to drink. But as of Friday afternoon, Mayor Bloomberg was saying that the I.N.G. New York City Marathon was still on. For days now, residents in housing projects in the Lower East Side have been relying on fire hydrants for their water—and the elderly and disabled, who can’t get up and down the stairs, need their neighbors to go to the hydrants for them.

But as of Friday afternoon, Mayor Bloomberg was saying that the I.N.G. New York City Marathon was still on. More than two hundred thousand of Con Edison’s customers in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island—and that’s customers, not individual people; if individual people were tallied, the number would be much higher—are without electricity, and Con Ed says they may not have it back for another ten days. But as of Friday afternoon, Mayor Bloomberg was saying that the I.N.G. New York City Marathon was still on. 

Around 5 P.M. E.T., the news broke that officials had, finally, decided to cancel the race—or, perhaps, to postpone it for later in the year. It was the right decision, but it took far too long to make.

 

 

 

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