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Finally, Genuine Progress in NHL Talks

Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

Shhhhh...

Amid the amazing buzz of a U.S. presidential election on Tuesday night, tucked away in a secret location in New York City, the NHL and NHL Players’ Association met for seven-plus hours and agreed to meet again on Wednesday.

More noticeable, though, was how quiet each side was after what has to be categorized as the most meaningful negotiating session to date.

Well, for starters, they actually stayed in a room and negotiated meaningfully, really, for the first time in this entire process.

The league put out a modest statement afterwards that simply said talks would continue the next day and the league would not characterize how Tuesday's meeting went. The NHLPA didn’t even put out a statement.
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