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Dollar Signs Explain Big Ten Expansion

AP

The world of college athletics' high finance was still trying to make the math work on Monday.

Maryland and Rutgers to the Big Ten?

ESPN can't convince Texans to watch Texas on the Longhorn Network. Who is it going to pay extra for two to three Maryland football games shoved behind what is essentially a pay wall on the Big Ten Network? Rutgers is 35 miles from Manhattan. But in terms of interest in New York media market, the school might as well be 3,500 miles away.

And don't forget ESPN is essentially walking away from Big East negotiations in a package that would include Rutgers in that lucrative Northeast corridor. How does Rutgers add value to the Big Ten?

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