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Coaches' Buyouts an Expensive Lesson

AP Photo

For an especially lucrative occupation, one might consider becoming a fired college football coach.

The latest symbol of the college football arms race is not the coaches’ salaries themselves but rather the money that university officials are spending to buy out those huge contracts when a coach falters.

After Tennessee fired its coach last week, the university’s chancellor said the athletic department would forgo $18 million in contributions it was to make to the university over the next three years for academic scholarships and fellowship programs. Instead, some of the money will be used to pay the severance packages of the coach, Derek Dooley, who is...

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