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Could Armstrong Be Part of the Solution?

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The deadline imposed by the United States Anti-Doping Agency for Lance Armstrong to "come clean under oath" and perhaps lessen his ban came and went today. Armstrong, through his attorney Tim Herman, released a statement reiterating his willingness to be "the first man through the door" to help clean up cycling, just so long as it's not to the USADA's building.

 

"We remain hopeful that an international effort will be mounted, and we will do everything we can to facilitate that result. In the meantime, for several reasons, Lance will not participate in USADA's efforts to selectively conduct American prosecutions that only demonize selected individuals while failing to address the 95% of the sport over which USADA has no jurisdiction."

 

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