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Here's Hoping Ausmus Is a Prodigy

The Associated Press

Hall of Fame right-hander Bob Feller never pitched in the minors. His overwhelming fastball propelled him to the majors with Cleveland in 1936 when he was 17.

 

By the time he was 22, Feller had led the American League in strikeouts for four straight seasons and had won 107 games.

 

Brad Ausmus might become the Bob Feller of managers.

 

Ausmus, a catcher for 18 seasons, never has served either of the two apprenticeships often required for a major league managerial candidate: minor league manager or major league coach.

 

Yet Ausmus, 44, became the hottest managerial candidate around. He interviewed for at least three managerial jobs this off-season, including the Tigers’ opening to succeed Jim Leyland.

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