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Justice Is Served


May 6, 2010 11:03 PM

Teen whore and the NFL star: Recipe for trouble

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Women just throw sex at star athletes like Lawrence Taylor. He can have all of it he can handle -- with women of no certain age. For star athletes are like rock stars, chick magnets for the groupies, the hangers-on and the sycophants.

So buy sex?  Why would Taylor when he could find sexual healing for free?

Yet that's what he is accused of - and more. Taylor, 51, is facing multiple felony charges that could send him to prison. And if he's guilty as accused, he deserves a cell next to O.J. Simpson's.

Now, I can't get too self-righteous as to question Taylor's visiting a prostitute. Friends of mine have gone that route, and they never have been accused of anything so unseemly. Besides, getting inside a woman who practices the world's oldest profession isn't the crime of the century, is it? Hell, it ain't the crime of the day.

It might be worth noting that the "prostitute" was 16, an age where she couldn't consent to sex. Taylor should no more be having relations with a teenage girl than he should be smoking crack.

Neither is a good bargain.


I hope the allegations leveled against Taylor, a pitchman for a weight-loss regimen, are just that, allegations. I would like to think he had the common sense not to stoop to spending money on forbidden sex, as alluring as the sex might be to some men.

Accusations like these need to be proved, and in a New York courtroom Thursday, Taylor's lawyer vowed they wouldn't be, according to ESPN and other news accounts. He denied that Taylor had consensual sex at a Holiday Inn with a teenager -- for money or for free.

True or not, the allegations against Taylor are disturbing. He has had his brushes with the court system throughout his life, almost a dozen of those encounters since 1986. Crack, that's what got him into trouble the last time he stood in front of a judge and faced charges as serious as these.

Crack can make a man do wild-and-crazy things. He will rob; he will steal; and he will do whatever it takes, absent reservations, to sate the beast that drug brings out of a person. Taylor knows this as well as any athlete who's strayed from the straight path. He risked all that he was for a crack pipe.

Taylor, however, ditched his junkie's habit. He got clean, and he revived his career, continuing to play linebacker better than anybody ever had. No. 56 personified greatness -- and Lawrence Taylor was great, a Hall of Famer. He changed games: as good as anybody else who ever lined up on defense.

His style of play was mad-dog reckless, and he seemingly tried to live his life outside the football field with the same recklessness. He put no limitations of his behavior, and maybe that's what made him excel in athletics.

Pro football isn't life, not the life that "ordinary" people face day after day. They never hear the cheers a star athlete like Taylor listens to. Nor do they experience the hero-worshipping that LT sees everywhere he turned.  

None of that adulation made him insulated him from rash judgments. It might, in fact, be behind his latest troubles, if any of it is true.

You hope not, though. You pray that Lawrence Taylor knew better than to go where no man belonged: inside a pimp's teenage whore.  

 

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